In early October Jean-Claude Juncker, the Luxembourgish Head of the European Commission, compared Britain to a friend who orders a round of drinks at the bar and then leaves without paying. This statement unfortunately carries truth.

David Davis, the minister responsible for our exiting the European Union, seems to believe that, in line with the Farageian vision of Brexit, we can simply pull up the drawbridge with no consequences.

How did we get here? Who is to blame? And how do we hold them to account?

Our farcical attempts at compromising with the European Commission over the so-called ‘divorce bill’ and any future trade deal is a worrying sign of the times in the Anglophone world.

Boris Johnson’s grotesque statements about Britain’s imports of Italian prosecco during the referendum campaign and Nigel Farage’s own claims of German car ownership in the UK show what an irrational, soundbite-persuaded country we have become.

Stateside, the same is happening, but to an even more extreme degree. Donald Trump’s infamous remark that ‘lots of things are done with uranium, including some bad things’ sent uranium stocks soaring.

Here in Britain, while the team of Remain politicians who sent us toward this swamp of uncertainty were perhaps struggling against populism’s quicksand it might have helped had they at least dipped their toes in. David Cameron and George Osbourne failed to persuade the public to vote for European membership.

Perhaps this was due to the fact that the last time they sailed too close to the wind, in the referendum for Scottish Independence, they narrowly won. But win they did.

The ‘establishment’ got a kicking because they thought that the sole message of ‘you’ll be impoverished’ was enough. This failed because the global financial crises, a double dip recession and years of harsh austerity had also failed.

But rather than blame the government of the day and vote them out in 2015, the British people were conned, in no small part by the Murdochs and Dacres of this world, into thinking that a legal body across the English Channel was to blame for their circumstances.

This is a betrayal by thinly-veiled xenophobes like Farage, deluded nationalists in the form of Davis and outdated economists such as Dr Fox. We are the ones who will faces the consequences of this farce.

Unbearably, those who claimed that we would become ‘the new Singapore’ will be nowhere to be seen once the ‘Titanic success’ (an actual quote of Boris Johnson’s about how he felt the negotiations were going) comes to fruition.

Just as Trump and the Republicans blamed the Democrats for the results of the 2008 Financial Crisis when years of financial deregulation in the Bush administration had helped to cause it, the likes of Johnson, Davis and Fox will fade away into political obscurity and face no accountability for this betrayal.

For me, a member of the generation who grew up with cheap holidays to Europe and who studied amongst the grandchildren of survivors of the Holocaust, the Spanish Civil War or, more recently refugees from the Balkans War, this is a betrayal by a political class much older and even more insidious than Tony Blair or David Cameron.

This is a betrayal by thinly-veiled xenophobes like Farage, deluded nationalists in the form of Davis and outdated economists such as Dr Fox. We are the ones who will faces the consequences of this farce.

I do not want Theresa May, Boris Johnson, David Davis or Liam Fox to get away with this in the way that Nigel Farage, David Cameron and Iain Duncan Smith already have.

Let them suffer under scrutiny otherwise this will be a legal and economic quagmire that our own generation has to mop up and undoubtedly get the blame for.